Daphne Caruana Galizia murder malta
malta, thoughts

Who killed Daphne? A year on, we’re still demanding answers

Daphne Caruana Galizia murder malta

Image credit: Reuters

I can hardly believe that it’s already been a full year since Daphne Caruana Galizia was assassinated just minutes away from her home in Malta. That’s 365 days of no justice and approximately 525,600 more minutes (and counting) of the government and its various institutions failing miserably. I wanted to add the number of times Daphne’s memorial had been cleared away and re-built, but quite frankly I’ve lost count.

Some days are harder than others

Every time I tap to open Facebook on my phone, I’m met with another smack in the face courtesy of news from back home. These days I barely recognise it as ‘home’, but that’s another story for another blog.

So like any other social media-saturated millennial, I scroll through Facebook, and inevitably come across some more bad news. Another scandal. Another lie. Another piece of Malta’s soul sold to the highest bidder.

Sadness or white-hot anger comes in waves, and sometimes the two come together and I feel overwhelmed. With frustration. Indignation. Disgust. Helplessness. Rage. Disbelief.

On those days, I sometimes need to take a moment and look away from it all before it builds into actual anxiety. I don’t like doing that, particularly because it’s in our own interest to look at this sad state of affairs squarely in the eyes. To be informed. To ask questions. To question authority, more so when they shy away and squirm and show us how much they hate it.

No. Collectively looking away is what got us here in the first place. But I, like many others, often find myself exhausted, buckling under the weight and relentlessness of it all.

But for the most part, I look

I look at every new, shoddy piece of propaganda the Prime Minister’s crew churn out and peddle to their supporters. I look at the blinkered masses sitting, open-mouthed and clamouring like baby birds, waiting to gobble up the next thinly-veiled lie dumped onto them by the powers that be. I sometimes wonder if politicians ever chuckle as they type what they know full well is bullshit of the highest order. Perhaps they’ve been lying and lied to for so long they scarcely know the difference any more. As a quick example, check out the post by ‘Justice Minister’ Owen Bonnici. Yeah, the one who cleared away the memorial and thereby violated our freedom of speech. 2+2=5:

I look at news of another shady link between another big shot bully and another unsavoury character and think about how, in a normal country, you’d resign at the faintest hint of scandal. You’d have some sense of shame. Dawn ma jistħux,  u ma jafux jistħu. All our politicians seem to have is pure arrogance. And lots of money. Money paid out of our pockets. Gentle reminder there.

I make myself look at comments and statuses on social media and I see some hope, some resistance, in the face of hate speech so vile you’d think those commenting were facing their worst enemy, rather than a total stranger whose only crime is trying to hold our government accountable, demanding justice and transparency.

Orwellian Malta

I look at the news that the protest memorial opposite the law courts has once again been cleared away, and wonder if it was on Owen Bonnici’s orders again or not. What are they so afraid of? Do they really think we’ll give up and forget that easily? They did it again last night. I struggle to call Mr Owen Bonnici ‘Justice Minister’ while keeping a straight face. Surely to be a minister of something like justice, one should fight for justice. I’m reminded now of George Orwell’s 1984 and the Ministry of Truth:

The Ministry of Truth is the ministry of propaganda. As with the other ministries in the novel, the name Ministry of Truth is a misnomer because in reality it serves the opposite: it is responsible for any necessary falsification of historical events. – Wikipedia

I look at all of this, and the sale of Maltese (also EU) passports, and the sale of what precious little untouched land we have left to people with more money than morals. I look at the pollution, the lies, the death, the crime, the venom, the impunity, the smoke and mirrors, the racism as a rallying cry, the overdevelopment and €10+ million apartments for the elite when locals can’t even afford to rent a shitty room in a shitty part of town anymore.

Finally, I look at the news that our most illustrious PM let his carefully-curated mask slip and issued an actual threat to Simon Busuttil. He told him he wouldn’t be able to set foot in Malta again – language unbecoming of a PM and more suited to something like a wannabe mafioso in a low-budget gangster movie. This is significant. When the PM appears to bully and threaten someone, it gives the trolls in the comments section and niche Facebook groups a sense of legitimacy when they do it, something like: “if our glorious leader can do this, then so can I. Hell, I’m probably doing him a favour.”

I see Glenn Bedingfield (remind me again what a sexist, ill-mannered bully of a man is doing in parliament?) saying ‘jitlifni’ (translation: he makes me lose my temper”) to justify swearing, in parliament, at Simon Busuttil. To the public, this says: you can attack people and it’s okay because they’re asking for it. It is not okay. This is dangerous.

The situation has never been so desperate

Certainly in not my twenty-something years of life, anyway. Those who lived through the Mintoff years see what’s happening with an intensified sense of dread because they recognise the signs. They know the violence, the fear that comes with an out-of-control government that operates more like a family business or brutish band club. There’s at least one key difference between then and now – social media. The whole world is watching, and we’re here to tweet, write, resist, protest, question, and fight. And I’ll bet my entire comic book collection that the powers that be can’t fucking stand it. They probably yearn for the good old days when they could carry out their shady business in peace. Oh well.

Identity crisis

What kind of labour government is this? As a supposedly centre-left party, labour is meant to represent and champion the rights of the people – specifically, the working class. The average Joe. What we have instead is a self-serving Labour government that caters to the millionaire, the property tycoon, the questionable banker, etc. Fuck the actual people you’re meant to serve, right?

I don’t know if we as a nation even know what our respective parties are meant to stand for any more; truthfully I don’t think they know themselves. But then that’s what happens when we treat politics like football matches and so-called leaders like gods for so many years. Muddied waters and blurred lines and blind tribalism. We are all losers here.

I remind you once again that politicians are doing us no favours by being in power. They are your elected officials, there to serve you, the citizen. They are literally paid out of your pocket. Hero worship and a refusal to hold them accountable over the years has brought us here. They slap us in the face, rifle through our pockets, laugh, and we say ‘thank you’ by giving them the vote or letting them off without so much as a double-take. Or by voting them in again. Hold your political leaders and their cronies accountable.

There is no ‘us’ and ‘them’. They want us to fight amongst ourselves because it takes the heat off of them. Forget party politics and talk of sore losers. Make no mistake – we’re all getting screwed over here. It doesn’t matter which colour you swore allegiance to in the past.

Resist.


Read more about Daphne’s murder and corruption in Malta here:

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international women's day
malta, thoughts

The Sound of (the Prime Minister’s) Silence

On the 5th of March the unofficial memorial set up by mourners following the assassination of investigative journalist, Daphne Caruana Galizia, was swept away overnight. Maybe ‘they’ thought that people would forget; uwiva, let it go ħi. Granted – overwhelming apathy and failure to stand up to the abuse of power is essentially how we got here in the first place, but they were wrong about this one. I write ‘they’ because I assume it took a few cowards to move that many tributes so quickly in the dead of night. Within hours, fresh flowers, candles, photos and banners sprang up once more, with those seeking justice for Daphne and fighting for freedom of speech feeling more determined than ever. I guess that one backfired. The people will not forget and they certainly won’t be silenced.

 

Daphne Caruana Galizia Memorial

Photo credit: The Shift News

 

Hush now

That’s what I want to talk about today – silence. You see, silence can be very loud. When somebody (a dirty politician or sham bank, for example) works hard to keep you quiet, then there’s a 99.9% chance that you know something that’ll see them exposed as the frothing cesspits they truly are. That’s bad for business. They’ll probably try to bully their way out of it by flinging out libel suits like a manic chimpanzee might fling excrement, or threaten to sue you, your grandparents, your auntie and the next three generations of your family if you speak up. Too often, the bullies win and the ones blowing the whistle are left vulnerable. This silence is one of fear.

Then there’s optional silence, far more telling than the silence discussed above. By saying nothing, people speak volumes. Amid all the public outcry and disgust at this underhanded move to erase her memory (and with it hush-up the call to defend freedom of speech and demand justice for her murder), our most illustrious Prime Minister has been very quiet indeed. Wait, sorry – he/his PR team has been quiet about this particular issue, but very busy tweeting about other things. On the 5th, @JosephMuscat_JM was mainly retweeting news about his favourite football team (Milan FC, in case you were curious) and the VOT16 result (16 year-olds can now vote in Malta, and how convenient for the PM that this news item was around to distract the masses on this specific day). He’s also been very talkative about his other smokescreens – I mean accomplishments. His account, like his time as PM, thrives on sycophants praising the hell out of this government, telling the world how proud they are to support his party. They genuinely believe they’re living in l-aqwa zmien (the ‘best of times’, Labour’s slogan). They do it so fervently that you’d think they’ve never heard of car bombings, a slain journalist, the Panama Papers scandal and shady dealings with even shadier people. He has said nothing about the clearing – not on social media, and not on any news articles or in any interviews. Nothing. Whether he gave the go ahead for the clearing or not is completely irrelevant – his silence, his failure to condemn the act, is what makes those responsible feel justified. It’s a failure to do his duty as PM. This silence is one of complicity.

And then there are all the questions. Why so silent? Who has the most to gain from having Daphne’s memory and public outrage fade away? Who has the most to lose when we do get #JusticeForDaphne, and who has the most to lose from real freedom of speech taking root in Malta?

Failure upon failure

Muscat’s deafening silence and the government’s overwhelming lack of action in response to the assassination is made far more apparent by the Solvakian government’s reaction to the recent murder of 27-year-old journalist, Jan Kuciak.  Kuciak was investigating tax fraud that had ties to the government; he and his partner were found shot dead in their home.  Three government officials have resigned (Malta: zero) and the president (who has the same powers as ours) has called for action in the form of an election or reshuffle. So – which Slovakian officials resigned?

  • Culture Minister, Marek Madarič
  • Chief State Advisor, Maria Trošková
  • Chair of the Security Council, Viliam Jasan

The Maltese equivalent of these officials would be something like Minister for Justice, Culture and Local Government, Owen Bonnici; Minister of National Security and Home Affairs, Michael Farrugia; and Minister of Foreign Affairs, Carmelo Abela. Just putting it out there.

Our government’s response has been abysmally bad. The sheer arrogance of our PM and his gang of cronies is actually astounding at this point. It’s an arrogance that became even clearer when Muscat was asked about his thoughts regarding the government’s accountability in the case of Daphne’s murder following their Slovakian counterpart’s response:

Naħseb li l-accountability tagħna hija li nsibu min għamel il-qtil […] u nsibu min bagħat dawk il persuni. (I think that our accountability is that we find the ones who committed the murder […] and find who sent those people.)

This is not accountability. This is an arrogant cop-out. What he’s saying here is that in his eyes, it’s all done an dusted now. He can try to wash his hands of the matter with as many bogus answers and smokescreens as he likes – the blood won’t rinse out so easily. Too many questions and crooks remain. It’s the same arrogance that we’ve somehow let politicians get away with for years. Now we’re reaping the rewards, and with the current opposition leader in place, the outlook seems pretty bleak right now.

Why do so many of us not only tolerate this open sewer of a government, but embrace it? Support it? Glorify it? Why do so many people idolise and hero-worship party leaders, acting like they can do no wrong and ready to ignore every evil and attack anyone who dares to oppose the great leader’s views like some sort of twisted mercenaries?

Your elected officials are there to serve the country. To serve you. They’re not doing us any favours (unless they’ve bribed you with some fancy government job, then yes they are because this isn’t a meritocracy right now). They’re being (over)paid to do a job, and believe me – if you or I were doing as a bad a job as them at our 9-to-5, we’d be fired and out the door by the end of this sentence. But that’s the fate of mortals like us; the gods sitting in their lofty parliamentary seats have (unanimously) approved amendments to the Pension Bill, meaning that MPs are eligible for a massive pension after serving for just five years. That’s a potential pension of €40,000 on top of their social security pension. Us mere mortals have to make NI contributions for around 25-35 years for a fraction of that amount. Considering their recent job performance, that hardly seems fair, does it?

-Kelly

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david walliams what the fuck
thoughts

4 Things Wrong with this Anti-Gay Marriage Ad (other than the obvious)

I generally try to have lowkey Sundays. You know, sit in the sun. Have some green tea while listening to Spotify and reading Time or The Economist. But sometimes the universe conspires against you to make sure your Sunday just tests you – case in point, the following ‘ad’ that was printed in MaltaToday:

gay marriage in malta

Let’s just take a minute to let this one sink in. Ready? Okay, time to break this down and take a look at what’s wrong with this ad – other than the fact that someone actually felt inclined to make an ‘ad’ like this. 

1 | It’s Total Bullshit

We’ve known each other for a while now, ladies and gents. You know I’m not one to mince my words (as hard as I may try for the sake of propriety). I’m a big reader, and I have to say that it’s truly a rare thing to find such a strong, pungent concentration of murky toilet-water as this. I don’t think this ad homophobic rant is representative of all the Catholics in Malta – just the ones who like to use the faith as something to hide behind while they’re peddling their existing hateful views.

homophobia in malta

Oh, and a word of advice to the wannabe Donald Draper who typed this thing out: saying ‘we respect everyone’ followed with ‘but’ a couple of sentences later is basically a way of saying, “forget everything I just said, it’s time to get to what I actually think. F*ck all of y’all.”

2 | It was Printed

Someone actually received this nonsense and said, “yep, this is something I think my publication should print. I like what this says about my newspaper. This is totally fine. Giving these people a platform for their hate-mongering is exactly the kind of thing I can do to make the world a better place today.”

gay marriage malta

What is wrong with people? Are we that greedy and so hard-up for cash that printing something like this is a fair trade-off? Isn’t there some sort of ethical issue here? Isn’t it irresponsible of a publication like this one to print something that just makes hateful people feel justified in their venomous views? I have a lot of questions.

3 | Marriage is…

Who the actual f*ck gave you zealots the right to decide what marriage is? Why can’t we just celebrate love instead of concerning ourselves with the gender of the people doing the loving? The world can be a dark, dank place, so excuse me if I think we should just be happy about the fact that people still have the hope and romance to believe in a ‘happily forever after’. Marriage is a promise two people make in front of their nearest and dearest. It’s a celebration of love and an oath symbolising that those people standing up in the nice outfits are going to do their damnedest to love each other like Kanye loves Kanye (and maybe even more). Your personal views on what marriage ‘is’ should never be imposed on anyone else. So mind your own business.

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4 | The Other N-Word

And by that I mean ‘natural’ versus ‘unnatural’. My coffee is in desperate need of a re-fill so I’ll make this one super easy to understand:

Natural (adjective)
existing in or derived from nature; not made or caused by humankind.
Examples: The Niagara Falls; Widnet il-Baħar; a beautiful sunset; my love for gin and tonic; heterosexual as well as homosexual relationships between living things.
Unnatural (adjective)
not existing in nature; artificial; man-made.
Examples: My make-up’d face as it appears on Instagram; the colour of my nails right now; the institution of marriage; the law; the Eurovision; Kinnie. 
Sorted? Sorted.
giphy (1)
Oh, and on the off-chance that the person who penned this full-page piece of garbage happens to come upon my distinctly unnatural blog, here’s another word I’ve taken the liberty of finding for you:
what does salty mean
Used in a sentence: “Stop being a salty bigot and let people love other people, get married, and have a damn party. Preferably with a considerably strong open bar.”
giphy (4)
Happy Sunday.*
-Kelly
*Only applicable to those who don’t go around chastising politicians while trying to take the moral high ground via a full-page homophobic rant. Grazzi. 
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thoughts

It’s starting to get to me.

Ominous title, I know. But you know me – I like to be as blunt and to-the-point as possible. Today’s topic is something that many living on tiny Malta will be familiar with – construction. More specifically, the unbridled spread of construction, cranes, and concrete across the island like some sort of cold, grey plague, and the general ugliness you’ll be smacked in the face with in most of our towns – particularly in central Malta. This is a taste of what you see during an incredible, fiery sunset in my hometown:

16473361_10154301435563316_7713514317804544091_n

Great view, isn’t it? How about no. It’s depressing, and messy, and it looks like nobody gives a damn. I’m embarrassed to say that this is my hometown. Half-finished apartments, cables and wires reaching across from block to block, and pavements and roads so riddled with holes and craters they’d give Sonny Corleone a run for his money. Of course, we always make sure that the roads used by foreign dignitaries are lovely and smooth, just in time for their visits – to hell with everyone else (i.e. the people who actually live here).

And the cranes. The cranes. 

During my 5-minute walk from my car to work, I counted no fewer than 8 gigantic cranes in St. Julian’s – and that’s without turning my head to look around. There used to be a bit of greenery just before heading down the hill to St. George’s bay, but that’s been ripped down and replaced with – wait for it – more parking spaces for a local taxi company. It bothered me, this assumption that we have the right to eat up every bit of nature or beauty in favour of more money and more parking spaces and more concrete.

If it’s not the cranes, it’s the so-called “Malta Planning Authority.”

I say ‘so-called’ because it’s less about the planning, and more about selling any piece of land or tearing down any building, regardless of historical and aesthetic value, to the highest bidder. There are some stunning town houses and villas dotted around central Malta, Sliema in particular, and it seems the ‘Planning Authority’ is perfectly fine with adding eyesore after eyesore, paying no mind to what the impact will be on the town or community as a whole. They’ve got a whopping 1.7 star review rating on their Facebook page, and if you ask me, that’s pretty generous. Check out what locals have to say about their ‘planning’ and you’ll see what I mean.

Where do ‘they’ draw the line? Why do we seem so powerless to do anything about it? How is it that we can have Valletta 2018 and the EU presidency on the one hand, and this, on top of the rampant corruption and general failure to govern on the other? You do know that Joseph Muscat hasn’t properly dealt with Konrad Mizzi’s Panama scandal, right? Why is Konrad Mizzi even working with the government at all? The list or questions goes on and on, so I’ll hit pause there. We just don’t deserve the EU presidency if our PM can’t clean up his own house. 

That’s what I’d love to know. Right now, I just feel like running away from this hot mess.

-Kelly

Check out a 2013 article about this issue here, and feel free to share your own thoughts and links below! 

 

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Uncategorized

[Exit, pursued by a hunter]

Inhabitants of the Mediterranean islands of Malta and Gozo are currently in the run-up to a referendum. The subject? Spring hunting, yay or nay? We do love a referendum here on the Maltese Islands, and it is a truth universally acknowledged that any political decision comes with a whole lot of trash-talk. Let me premise this post by saying that I, for one, don’t see any logical reason to allow hunting during the season where birds are supposedly meant to be reproducing. I only studied biology at O-level, but I’m about 99.9% sure that you birds  need to be alive to reproduce. Even if I were in favour of hunting (which I’m not, at all) the logical thing to do is not hunt at this crucial time in order to allow the ‘stock’ of birds to be replenished, but who has time for common sense these days? The fact that we even need a referendum about something means there’s a divided opinion on the matter. Fine, you have your opinion, I have mine. I’ll explain, in a civilised and diplomatic way, why I think I’m right and you’ll do the same in turn – right? Wrong. It’s difficult to put Maltese politics into an easy-to-understand nutshell, however I do think that the following extract from a 2006 article by The Times of Malta sums up the ‘Pro-Spring-hunting’ side of things rather well:

“BirdLife and co. will feel the full weight of the wrath of FKNK and Maltese hunters and trappers”. […] In an aggressive statement, Mr [Lino] Farrugia said anyone who wanted to abolish traditions like hunting and trapping would first have to step “over a lot of dead bodies”. 

It has to be said that ‘dead bodies’ may have been a tad too dramatic on his part. How can I be certain that this aggressive tone persists even in 2015? Well, for the most part you’ll have to trust a girl actually living on the island in question. This more recent article from the official SHOUT (Spring Hunting Out) page might persuade you – or it might not. The official FKNK Facebook page and website do seem quite tame and generally respectable, but let’s be practical. There’s a vast difference between the PR-endorsed side of the Pro-hunting debate and the ugly day-to-day reality – the ‘dark underbelly’, if you will.

Sign (in atrociously bad Maltese) reads: ‘Hunters – treated worse than criminals). Poor lambs. Being confronted by this group of gentlemen wouldn’t be threatening at all, would it?

The bottom line is this – they’re the Federation for Hunting, Trapping and (though they seem to forget) Conservation. If they want the rights afforded by the first two activities, then they need to be able to perform when it comes to the third, because quite frankly conservation isn’t just about rebuilding stone huts and walls. 

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